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3 Ways to Use Old Glass Bottles | WD-40

3 Ways to Use Old Glass Bottles

3 Ways to Use Old Glass Bottles

March 11, 2021

Tip: Use WD-40® Multi-Use Product to remove the labels and tape from glass bottles.

Is your recycling overflowing with old wine, beer, and soda bottles? Getting creative with excess materials such as glass is not only good for the Earth, it can also be great for your home décor. By simply adding paint, twine, or other craft supplies, you can give an old bottle a new purpose. Here are three easy and creative ways you can upcycle your old bottles.

 

1. Bottle Garden Edging

Want to spruce up your garden or home’s walkway without hauling rocks or breaking the bank? Bob Vila’s edging project uses old glass bottles to keep your dirt where it should be and gives your yard or garden some character. Simply dig a trench about eight inches deep around your garden bed or walkway and place the bottles facedown in the trench, side-by-side along the edge of the garden bed or walkway. Next, replace the dirt you removed when you dug the trench, filling the dirt around the bottles and tap the dirt around each bottle with your hands so the bottles are secured firmly in the ground.

 

2. Yarn-Wrapped Bottle Vases

No need to spend money on purchasing new vases, this yarn-wrapped bottle vase idea found on Bob Vila’s website is perfect for those who want to spice up the look of their home, but are on a tight budget. All you need is a spool of yarn and some glue to keep it in place. Starting at the bottom, wrap the yarn snugly around the bottle and glue it in place so no glass shows. If you’d like a more rustic look, you can wrap the bottle with twine instead of yarn.

 

3. Glass Soda Bottle Bird Feeder

This crafty, homemade bird feeder from Birds and Blooms costs a just few dollars to make and adds a lot of character to your garden. For a list of materials, click here. Once you have the bottle, find something to hold the neck to keep it in place (for example, a small glass). Next, under running water, use a 1-inch diamond drill bit to make a hole in the bottom of the bottle. As this is the most difficult part of the project, check out wikiHow’s article on how to drill a hole in glass before doing this step.

After you’ve made the hole in the glass, drill a hole in the center of the chicken feeder base and soda bottle cap. Then, connect the turnbuckle and steel rod by removing one of the eyehooks from the turnbuckle and screwing the rod into place. Feed the steel rod through the top of the bottle, past the hole in the bottom of the bottle and through the hole in the chicken feeder. Firmly press the bottle cap down on the lip of the bottle. Holding the feeder upside down, place the washer over the threaded rod and screw the wing nut in place. Next, attach a hook (Birds and Blooms recommends a G-hook) and string to the top of the soda bottle cap and fill your bird feeder with your favorite seeds and reattach the bottom. Voila, you now are ready to feed the birds.

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